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How Crown Lengthening Can Improve Your Smile

December 11th, 2019

“Crown lengthening”? Probably not an expression most of us are familiar with! In fact, this is a common periodontal procedure designed to improve both the health and the appearance of our smiles by revealing more of the tooth surface usually hidden by our gums.

What is Crown Lengthening?

The “crown” is the part of our tooth covered by enamel, while the “lengthening” is actually the result of revealing more of the tooth. Usually, Doctors Bauer, Lawrenz, and Stark will use a local anesthetic to numb the area, and remove gum tissue from the base of a specific tooth or teeth. If necessary, a small amount of bone tissue might be removed from the base of the tooth as well. This process exposes more tooth surface. When the ideal tooth length is visible, the tissue around it is then shaped for an even appearance and the repositioned gum tissue is often sutured in place. We will always tailor this treatment to your specific needs, so talk to us about our treatment plan for you. We will explain the surgery, after care, and follow-up visits.

Why Consider Crown Lengthening?

  • To Repair an Injured Tooth

Sometimes a tooth suffers an injury that makes it impossible to repair without crown lengthening. If a tooth is broken off at the gumline, or suffers a fracture that extends to the gumline, more of the tooth will need to be exposed so that there is enough remaining natural tooth to support a crown. Similarly, this procedure might also be necessary for a filling if decay has affected the tooth near the gumline. Crown lengthening can enable us to perform a restoration and save a tooth where an extraction might otherwise take place.

  • For Cosmetic Improvement

An excess of gum tissue can lead to a “gummy” smile. Crown lengthening can reduce extra gum tissue and, if needed, bone tissue, to provide you with a well-proportioned smile. The gum tissue will be contoured for an even, attractive gumline. This process is carefully designed to create a balance of lips, teeth, and gums for your most appealing smile. Crown lengthening might also be advisable if more tooth surface is needed for veneers.

Call our Champlin, MN office if you have any questions about this procedure, whether for restorative or cosmetic reasons. “Crown lengthening” might be a term you’ve never heard before. But it might be exactly the procedure you need to ensure healthy teeth and a beautiful smile.

What makes a periodontist different from a dentist?

December 4th, 2019

“Dentists, periodontists … what’s the difference, anyway?” We hear our patients asking this question as they wonder about the difference between the two specialties. Periodontists like Doctors Bauer, Lawrenz, and Stark are more than just oral health professionals. Unlike dentists, who act more like general practitioners, periodontists focus on treating the soft tissue (gums) and bones supporting the teeth, as well gum disorders. Sure, dentists can prevent the onset of gum disease through regular cleanings and prescribing medications. But it is periodontists who are required for more complex and advanced cases of gum disease called periodontitis, a gum infection that, if left untreated, can lead to tooth loss. Periodontitis is a condition that most dentists simply don’t treat. The most severe cases of periodontitis can even lead to serious health problems such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancers of the head, neck, and pancreas.

To make things simpler, we’ve come up reasons for when you should visit the dentist and when you should give us a call to book an appointment with Doctors Bauer, Lawrenz, and Stark:

Visit your general dentist for:

  • Checkups and cleanings
  • X-rays
  • Filling cavities
  • Root canals
  • Tooth extractions
  • Crowns or bridges
  • Select cosmetic procedures such as veneers, bonding, and teeth whitening
  • Pediatric (children’s) care

Visit Doctors Bauer, Lawrenz, and Stark for:

  • Deep pocket cleanings (to remove debris and infection-causing bacteria)
  • Bone grafts
  • Soft tissue removal
  • Scaling and root planing (deep cleaning)
  • Implant replacement
  • Crown lengthening
  • Osteoplasty (hard tissue recontouring)
  • Gingivoplasty (soft tissue recontouring)

To learn more about the differences between periodontists like Doctors Bauer, Lawrenz, and Stark and your general dentist, or to schedule your next visit, please give us a call today! We look forward to seeing and treating you!

Thanksgiving in North America

November 27th, 2019

Thanksgiving marks the start to the holidays; a season filled with feasting, indulging, and spending time with family and friends are always special. Thanksgiving is a holiday meant for giving thanks, and while this may seem like such a natural celebration, the United States is only one of a handful of countries to officially celebrate with a holiday.

Unlike many holidays, Thanksgiving is a secular holiday, and it is celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November in the United States. In Canada, it is celebrated on the second Monday of October, which is, oddly enough, much closer to a time when harvests were likely gathered. In addition to the different dates, the origins of the celebration also share different roots.

Thanksgiving in the United States

Giving thanks for a bountiful harvest are not new, but the modern day holiday in the US can be traced to a celebration at Plymouth in Massachusetts in 1621. This feast of thanksgiving was inspired by a good harvest, and the tradition was simply continued on. At first, the colony at Plymouth didn't have enough food to feed everyone present, but the Native Americans helped by providing seeds and teaching them how to fish, and they soon began to be able to hold a feast worthy of the name. The tradition spread, and by the 1660s, most of New England was hosting a Thanksgiving feast in honor of the harvest.

Canadian Thanksgiving

An explorer of early Canada named Martin Frobisher is accredited for the first Canadian Thanksgiving. He survived the arduous journey from England through harsh weather conditions and rough terrain, and after his last voyage from Europe to present-day Nunavut, he held a formal ceremony to give thanks for his survival and good fortune. As time passed and more settlers arrived, a feast was added to what quickly became a yearly tradition. Another explorer, Samuel de Champlain, is linked to the first actual Thanksgiving celebration in honor of a successful harvest; settlers who arrived with him in New France celebrated the harvest with a bountiful feast.

A Modern Thanksgiving

Today, Thanksgiving is traditionally celebrated with the best of Americana. From feasts and football games to getting ready for the start of the Christmas shopping season, Thanksgiving means roasted turkey, pumpkin pie, and green bean casserole. No matter how you celebrate this momentous day, pause for a moment to give thanks for your friends, family, and all the bounties you’ve received. Happy Thanksgiving from Champlin Family Dental!

Is periodontal disease genetic?

November 20th, 2019

It can be. There is more and more evidence to suggest people may be genetically susceptible to periodontal (gum) disease. According to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology, as much as 30 percent of the U.S. population may be genetically vulnerable to gum disease.

Research has suggested that bacteria causing periodontal disease are passed via saliva. This means that when family members come into contact with each other’s saliva by activities such as sharing drinks, they put themselves at risk for contracting periodontal disease. Based on this research, experts at the American Academy of Periodontology strongly recommend that all family members receive a periodontal disease screening if one of their family members has gum disease.

Despite persistent oral care habits such as brushing twice daily, flossing, and going to the dentist twice a year, these people may be more likely to develop periodontal disease at some point in their lifetime. Luckily, Doctors Bauer, Lawrenz, and Stark and our team can identify these patients by having them undergo a genetic test that analyzes genes and can help us identify an person’s risk for periodontal disease, as well as getting them into early intervention treatment.

Periodontal disease prevention starts with a visit to our Champlin, MN office. During your appointment, Doctors Bauer, Lawrenz, and Stark and our professional team can identify whether you have gum disease or if you are at risk for developing gum disease. Together we can take the necessary steps to treat the disease or prevent it entirely.

To learn more about preventing gum disease, or to schedule your next visit at Champlin Family Dental, please give us a call today!

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